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New statistics reveal shocking increase in North East brain injury admissions

New statistics reveal shocking increase in North East brain injury admissions

There were more brain injury admissions per head of population to hospitals in the North East of England than any other region in England last year, according a new report issued by brain injury charity Headway.

There were more brain injury admissions per head of population to hospitals in the North East of England than any other region in England last year, according a new report issued by brain injury charity Headway.

More than 16,000 people – or 616 out of every 100,000 – were admitted to hospitals in the region for diagnoses including non-superficial head injuries, strokes, brain tumours, encephalitis, and a variety of additional conditions.

Using hospital admissions statistics, the charity has compiled the first dataset on ABI-related (acquired brain injury) hospital admissions in the UK. This is the first time a picture of incidence rates for all ABI in the UK has been published, with the figures highlighting the concerning number of people in the region sustaining injuries to the brain each year.

Key findings from the research include (for admissions to hospitals in the North East in 2013/14):

  • 16,090 admissions for all forms of ABI
  • 616 admissions for all forms of ABI per 100,000 population – highest in England and above UK rate of 566
  • 7,295 admissions for non-superficial head injuries
  • 279 head injuries per 100,000 population
  • Males 1.9 times more likely than females to be admitted for a head injury
  • Female head injury admissions up 12% since 2006/07
  • 5,950 stroke admissions in 2013/14 – up 8% since 2006/07

“These new figures are a real cause for concern,” said Sue Chappell, a Trustee of Headway Darlington, which supports local people affected by brain injury.

“Admission to hospital for an ABI-related diagnosis does not necessarily mean a patient will be left with short or long-term deficits requiring rehabilitation or support. Many of those admitted each year will be left with no lasting cognitive, physical, or behavioural deficits as a result of their injuries.

Sue, a specialist personal injury solicitor with Burnetts in Gosforth, continued, “Many others, however, will not be so lucky and will face an arduous battle to rebuild their lives and re-learn skills most of us take for granted, including walking and talking. Even those who make good recoveries are still likely to require some support and information from charities like Headway Darlington.

“Such a significant number of people admitted to hospital with ABI-related diagnoses, coupled with the fact the majority of these people will survive, suggests an ever-increasing demand on our services.

“We hope that these statistics will make people realise that brain injury is more common than they may have realised. It can happen to anyone at any time and, when it does, we’re here to help. But we need more support to ensure we can continue to support local people to rebuild their lives.”

For further information on Headway Darlington, to make a donation to the charity, or to pledge your fundraising or voluntary support, please contact Sue Chappell on 0191 3001833 , or visit http://headwaydarlington.org.uk/ .

Notes to editors:

Further information about the statistics

The Headway report, Acquired Brain Injury: The numbers behind the hidden disability, can be downloaded from the Headway website.

  • Acquired brain injury (ABI) is an umbrella term for any injury to the brain sustained since birth, excluding neurodegenerative conditions.
  • The most common forms of ABI are traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. Other causes include brain tumour, meningitis, aneurysm, haemorrhage, encephalitis, anoxia, and other conditions.
  • Figures presented have been obtained using the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) system in England and its equivalents elsewhere in the UK. These systemically record all hospital admissions according to diagnosis by International Classification of Disease Version 10 (ICD-10) code. The admission figures presented here are for primary diagnosis (the main condition required for treatment on admission).
  • Years refer to financial years (1 April – 31 March).
  • Head injury figures are for non-superficial injuries, therefore increasing the likelihood that the majority of those represented in these figures will require some degree of information, support or rehabilitation on either a short or long-term basis.

About Headway Darlington

Headway Darlington & District is a branch of Headway, the brain injury association, a UK-wide charity that works to improve life after brain injury. Headway Darlington was established in June 2013 and opted to register for independent charitable status with the charities commission in late 2014.

Our vision is:  “Rebuilding lives after brain injury”. We aim to become the service of choice in the Darlington & District area for providing continued support to individuals and families affected by brain injury.

Published: Monday 18th May 2015
Categorised: Legal Services in Newcastle, Medical Negligence, Serious Injury

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